Posts Tagged ‘work abroad’

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Don’t Work to Travel, Travel to Work with a SWAP Holiday!

June 11, 2010

If you’re a student, you have lots of options to study abroad. But what about after you graduate? Do you have to become a tourist like everyone else?

Nope.

If you’re a Canadian between the ages of 18 and 30, you can apply for a working holidaymaker visa to a few different countries, including Britain, Ireland, France, Germany, Australia and New Zealand. (For Ireland and New Zealand, you can apply up to age 35.)

A working holiday visa allows you to live and work in a country, just like a local, usually for up to a year. Instead of living in hostels and tour buses, you’ll have a chance to settle in, get to know your neighbors, and develop a deeper understanding of a place.

There are no bad destinations, but for now let’s concentrate on Australia. It’s beautiful, slightly exotic, has great weather, friendly people, plenty of opportunities for adventure and is more affordable than some European destinations.

So if you’re in your mid-20s, having a bit of a quarter-life crisis and trying to figure out what to do next (quit your job? go back to school? have a little more fun while you’re still young and unattached enough to enjoy it?) working in Australia for a year could be a great next step.

You’ll be working and earning some money, which is a responsible thing to do, and you might even find a job that will give you experience that can be applied to a future career. You’ll also be in a country full of backpackers who are looking to have a good time. It’s the best of both worlds, really.

If you’re ready to apply, or if you have some questions about working holidays, visit swap.ca.

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Where Should I Live in Australia?

March 5, 2010

Map by Lonely Planet

If my last blog post about working holidays in Australia made you at least consider doing it, and I really hope it did, then the next step is to start making plans about what to do after you get there.

The first question you should ask yourself: Where am I going to live?

As far as picking a town to settle down in, do you want the urban excitement of Sydney? The casual cool of Melbourne? Someplace close to adventure, like Cairns? Or maybe you want to pick a dusty little outback town and see how the ranchers and miners used to – and sometimes still do – live.

This is where guidebooks and other travelers can come in handy. I chose Sydney when I did my working holiday, mostly because I had friends there, but also because it’s a beautiful place near both beaches and mountains and with lots of nightlife and activities.

Other things to consider:

  1. What kind of work are you looking for? If you have the skills and experience for an office job, then the big cities will have more opportunities and pay higher wages. If you’d rather pick fruit up and down the east coast, then you might look into smaller, rural towns.
  2. What kind of adventures do you want to have? If you’re into scuba diving or boating, head north, around the Great Barrier Reef. If you want to hike and rock climb, take a look at cities around the Grampians.

There really aren’t any bad parts of Australia to live in, and you might want to try more than one area out. Be flexible with your expectations, and your itinerary, and you’re sure to have an amazing experience.

So where are you headed?
Lisa

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Start Planning Your Australian Working Holiday

March 3, 2010

If you’re a student, you have lots of options to study abroad. But what about after you graduate? Do you have to become a tourist like everyone else?

Nope.

If you’re a Canadian between the ages of 18 and 30, you can apply for a working holidaymaker visa to a few different countries, including Britain, Ireland, France, Germany, Australia and New Zealand. (For Ireland and New Zealand, you can apply up to age 35.)

A working holiday visa allows you to live and work in a country, just like a local, usually for up to a year. Instead of living in hostels and tour buses, you’ll have a chance to settle in, get to know your neighbors, and develop a deeper understanding of a place.

There are no bad destinations, but for now let’s concentrate on Australia. It’s beautiful, slightly exotic, has great weather, friendly people, plenty of opportunities for adventure and is more affordable than some European destinations.

So if you’re in your mid-20s, having a bit of a quarter-life crisis and trying to figure out what to do next (quit your job? go back to school? have a little more fun while you’re still young and unattached enough to enjoy it?) working in Australia for a year could be a great next step.

You’ll be working and earning some money, which is a responsible thing to do, and you might even find a job that will give you experience that can be applied to a future career. You’ll also be in a country full of backpackers who are looking to have a good time. It’s the best of both worlds, really.

If you’re ready to apply, or if you have some questions about working holidays, visit swap.ca.

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Spend Your Summer Working Abroad – SWAP!

January 13, 2010

Australia and New Zealand are just two of the fabulous destinations you can choose from with SWAP.

What are your summer plans right now? Working in a restaurant or at the mall? Tutoring? Hanging out at the beach?

What if you could do that stuff, but in a different country? Work part time, hang out with new friends, but spend your free time exploring castles or swimming with dolphins or practicing your German or French?

Sign up with SWAP Canada to travel and work abroad and enjoy kind people, an exotic environment, and outdoor activities that you might not be able to find close to home. You can also choose to participate in a volunteer project and get the added benefit of helping others while having the greatest summer of your lifetime.

SWAP Working Holidays is a non-profit program that offers young Canadians a truly unique opportunity to explore the world through work and travel. One of their travel counsellors will help you pick a destination, walk you through the paperwork and work with you to plan your travel.

Once you’re signed up, you’ll also have access to SWAP Exchange, a community of other travelers, so you can get to know other participants before you ever leave home.

Travel like this takes planning, so visit www.swap.ca, or go to any Travel CUTS office for more information.