Posts Tagged ‘SWAP’

h1

Summer 2011 Is Coming! Work and Travel Around Australia

February 5, 2011

Australia and New Zealand are just two of the fabulous destinations yuo can choose from with SWAP.

Whatcha doin’ this summer? How about working and travelling your way around (the hopefully unflooded and headed into recovery) Australia?

If you’re a Canadian between the ages of 18 and 30, you can apply for a working holidaymaker visa to a few different countries, including Britain, Ireland, France, Germany, Australia and New Zealand. (For Ireland and New Zealand, you can apply up to age 35.)

A working holiday visa allows you to live and work in a country, just like a local, usually for up to a year. Instead of living in hostels and tour buses, you’ll have a chance to settle in, get to know your neighbors, and develop a deeper understanding of a place.

There are no bad destinations, but for now let’s concentrate on Australia. It’s beautiful, slightly exotic, has great weather, friendly people, plenty of opportunities for adventure and is more affordable than some European destinations.

You’ll be working and earning some money, which is a responsible thing to do, and you might even find a job that will give you experience that can be applied to a future career. You’ll also be in a country full of backpackers who are looking to have a good time. It’s the best of both worlds, really.

If you’re ready to apply, or if you have some questions about working holidays, visit swap.ca.

h1

Don’t Work to Travel, Travel to Work with a SWAP Holiday!

June 11, 2010

If you’re a student, you have lots of options to study abroad. But what about after you graduate? Do you have to become a tourist like everyone else?

Nope.

If you’re a Canadian between the ages of 18 and 30, you can apply for a working holidaymaker visa to a few different countries, including Britain, Ireland, France, Germany, Australia and New Zealand. (For Ireland and New Zealand, you can apply up to age 35.)

A working holiday visa allows you to live and work in a country, just like a local, usually for up to a year. Instead of living in hostels and tour buses, you’ll have a chance to settle in, get to know your neighbors, and develop a deeper understanding of a place.

There are no bad destinations, but for now let’s concentrate on Australia. It’s beautiful, slightly exotic, has great weather, friendly people, plenty of opportunities for adventure and is more affordable than some European destinations.

So if you’re in your mid-20s, having a bit of a quarter-life crisis and trying to figure out what to do next (quit your job? go back to school? have a little more fun while you’re still young and unattached enough to enjoy it?) working in Australia for a year could be a great next step.

You’ll be working and earning some money, which is a responsible thing to do, and you might even find a job that will give you experience that can be applied to a future career. You’ll also be in a country full of backpackers who are looking to have a good time. It’s the best of both worlds, really.

If you’re ready to apply, or if you have some questions about working holidays, visit swap.ca.

h1

Start Planning Your Australian Working Holiday

March 3, 2010

If you’re a student, you have lots of options to study abroad. But what about after you graduate? Do you have to become a tourist like everyone else?

Nope.

If you’re a Canadian between the ages of 18 and 30, you can apply for a working holidaymaker visa to a few different countries, including Britain, Ireland, France, Germany, Australia and New Zealand. (For Ireland and New Zealand, you can apply up to age 35.)

A working holiday visa allows you to live and work in a country, just like a local, usually for up to a year. Instead of living in hostels and tour buses, you’ll have a chance to settle in, get to know your neighbors, and develop a deeper understanding of a place.

There are no bad destinations, but for now let’s concentrate on Australia. It’s beautiful, slightly exotic, has great weather, friendly people, plenty of opportunities for adventure and is more affordable than some European destinations.

So if you’re in your mid-20s, having a bit of a quarter-life crisis and trying to figure out what to do next (quit your job? go back to school? have a little more fun while you’re still young and unattached enough to enjoy it?) working in Australia for a year could be a great next step.

You’ll be working and earning some money, which is a responsible thing to do, and you might even find a job that will give you experience that can be applied to a future career. You’ll also be in a country full of backpackers who are looking to have a good time. It’s the best of both worlds, really.

If you’re ready to apply, or if you have some questions about working holidays, visit swap.ca.

h1

Who Do You Want to Visit in Australia?

February 8, 2010

“Every country is like a particular type of person. America is like a belligerent adolescent boy, Canada is like an intelligent thirty-five-year-old woman. Australia is like Jack Nicholson. It comes right up to you and laughs very hard in your face in a highly threatening and engaging manner.”

-Douglas Adams, “The Salmon of Doubt”

I love Douglas Adams (“The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy” guy) and find most of his observations to be pretty accurate, but I’m not so sure about this one.

For one thing, summing up all of Australia by comparing it to an American actor seems a bit off. There are plenty of strong Aussie personalities that you could use. For another thing, I don’t think Jack Nicholson would last a week in Australia on his own, so he doesn’t deserve to represent this fabulous place. Oh, sure, if he was holed up in some swanky hotel he’d be alright, but drop him off in Coober Pedy with a swag and no cell phone and he’d be toast.

I’m also not so sure about Australia being “threatening”. A bit scary maybe, with all the poisonous and carnivorous animals that would happily kill you, but overall I’d have to say it’s far more exciting and welcoming than anything else. Much more Baz Luhrmann than Jack Nicholson.

Each part of Australia is a little different though, so here’s my human map of the country:

The Gold Coast: This is Kylie Minogue territory. You’ve got sun and beaches, clubs, pubs, lots of opportunities to dance and party and have a great time.

Sydney: Like any big, metropolitan area, Sydney is a hub of culture but that doesn’t mean it’s hoity-toity. It’s approachable and playful, kind of like Portia de Rossi, but also edgy, like Silverchair’s Daniel Johns.

Melbourne: Clearly, this is Nicole Kidman. A little posher than Sydney, a little calmer, and a great place to shop.

Canberra: It’s important, being the capital and all, but nobody really wants to go there. I’d say Canberra is author Peter Carey – his books are well respected, probably something you should read, but not exactly fun.

Alice Springs: It’s rugged, it can be dangerous, and you have to pretty tough to make it here, but with sweeping views and massive skies Alice Springs also has a sexy, romantic side, like the American Old West. This is Hugh Jackman.

Brisbane/BrisVegas: Cheesy fun? Olivia Newton-John.

Northern Territory: This has to be Steve Irwin. Most of it is wild and untamed, but there’s a lot of heart in the people who live here and love it.

Perth: It’s the only major city in Australia I haven’t been to, so I have to speculate a little bit, but since it’s occupied by people who don’t mind living in the most remote part of an already remote country, I’d have to say Guy Pierce. He’s a great actor, but not one of the first names that springs to mind when I think about famous Aussies. He’s sort of out on the edges.

And now that I’ve got you all excited about the multiple personalities of the Land Down Under, are you ready to start planning your trip? Learn all about a SWAP working holiday in Australia.

h1

Spend Your Summer Working Abroad – SWAP!

January 13, 2010

Australia and New Zealand are just two of the fabulous destinations you can choose from with SWAP.

What are your summer plans right now? Working in a restaurant or at the mall? Tutoring? Hanging out at the beach?

What if you could do that stuff, but in a different country? Work part time, hang out with new friends, but spend your free time exploring castles or swimming with dolphins or practicing your German or French?

Sign up with SWAP Canada to travel and work abroad and enjoy kind people, an exotic environment, and outdoor activities that you might not be able to find close to home. You can also choose to participate in a volunteer project and get the added benefit of helping others while having the greatest summer of your lifetime.

SWAP Working Holidays is a non-profit program that offers young Canadians a truly unique opportunity to explore the world through work and travel. One of their travel counsellors will help you pick a destination, walk you through the paperwork and work with you to plan your travel.

Once you’re signed up, you’ll also have access to SWAP Exchange, a community of other travelers, so you can get to know other participants before you ever leave home.

Travel like this takes planning, so visit www.swap.ca, or go to any Travel CUTS office for more information.

h1

Attend a Travel Talk in Canada

August 12, 2008

If you’re a student in Canada, check out this list of free Travel Talks for a city near you. The talks take place all through Fall 2008 and are hosted by Travel CUTS. Topics include:

  • Europe On a Budget
  • Australia On A Budget
  • Costa Rica
  • The Gal├ípagos Islands
  • Riding the Trans-Mongolian Railway
  • Southeast Asia
  • SWAP Talk – Student Work Abroad Program
  • The talks are co-sponsored by Canada’s Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade, so you’re sure to get the most relevant, up-to-date travel details possible. If you’re deciding where your next big trip will take you, these talks will help you explore your possibilities and see how far you can get, and for how long, on a budget that works for you.

    And if you’ve decided where you want to go, but your parents still need convincing, showing them that you’ve done your travel homework can’t hurt.